Is No News Good News After Scan?

Can a receptionist give you test results?

General Information about Test Results A receptionist can tell you the advice the doctor has given, i.e.

normal result or you need to see the Doctor or Nurse..

Will I get my CT scan results straight away?

Your scan results won’t usually be available immediately. A computer will need to process the information from your scan, which will then be analysed by a radiologist (a specialist in interpreting images of the body).

How long wait for CT scan results?

Scans typically take just minutes, and many last only seconds. Your entire exam, including the scan itself, will likely last no more than 30 minutes. Your physician will receive the results of your scan within 24 hours and share them with you.

Do bad biopsy results take longer?

The time it takes to get results from a biopsy can vary. During a surgery, a pathologist may read a biopsy and report back to a surgeon in a few minutes. Final, highly accurate conclusions on biopsies often take a week or longer. You will probably follow up with your regular doctor to discuss the biopsy results.

Are CT scan results immediate?

CT Scan. CT Scans are one of the few tests where your doctor or radiology can receive test results nearly immediately. Your radiologists will review and interpret your CT scan as soon as it’s completed.

What if my CT scan is abnormal?

CT scan results are considered normal if the radiologist didn’t see any tumors, blood clots, fractures, or other abnormalities in the images. If any abnormalities are detected during the CT scan, you may need further tests or treatments, depending on the type of abnormality found.

Do doctors call with good test results?

Most people assume their doctor will call them if they get a bad test result. But new research shows that doctors frequently fail to inform patients about abnormal test results.

Why would a doctor not give test results over the phone?

The main reason is simple – it’s better for you. Often, your doctor’s day is divided into 15-minute intervals. In some situations, calling many patients to communicate results over the phone is simply not feasible.

Will doctors call right away with bad test results?

If a normal or negative test result comes back, the physician can telephone the patient with the “good news,” and patients have the option of canceling the follow-up appointment. Although it is preferable to give bad news face-to-face, there may be times when giving bad news over the phone is unavoidable.

Can doctors tell you results over the phone?

Giving information over the phone is reasonable to do if done properly. Clearly, a doctor or a doctor’s office shouldn’t call and leave a message on the answering machine. But if a patient calls for the results, someone in the office should be available to give the test results.

Can a radiologist tell you results?

Most patients have their results within 48 hours. Also, Edwards said, patients can request a copy of their results after the radiologist reads the test. “People do have a right to see their reports,” she said.

Is no news good news from doctor?

No news isn’t necessarily good news for patients waiting for the results of medical tests. The first study of its kind finds doctors failed to inform patients of abnormal cancer screenings and other test results 1 out of 14 times.

What does it mean no news is good news?

Definition of no news is good news —used to say that one is told only the bad things about somethingWe haven’t heard from his teacher lately, but no news is good news.

Do doctors call with CT scan results?

Your CT pictures will be studied by a radiologist and the results will be sent to the doctor who referred you for the scan. They will discuss the results with you and any treatment you may need. If you are an outpatient please allow two weeks for the results to be sent to your referring doctor.

How do doctors break bad news to a patient?

Be frank but compassionate; avoid euphemisms and medical jargon. Allow for silence and tears; proceed at the patient’s pace. Have the patient describe his or her understanding of the news; repeat this information at subsequent visits. Allow time to answer questions; write things down and provide written information.